On July 28 and 29, the penultimate weekend of Marilyn Monroe’s life, Frank Sinatra was performing at the Cal-Neva Lodge (see photo), located half in California and half in Nevada (the Nevada half—this was the gimmick—featured gambling). What happened that weekend is shrouded in mystery, but Monroe was by all accounts drunk and stoned throughout, and photographer Billy Woodfield, who often did work for Sinatra, claimed to the end of his life that Sinatra brought him pictures that were taken in Chalet 52, where Monroe was staying.

“Woodfield stated that when Sinatra returned from Cal-Neva, he brought Woodfield a roll of film to be developed,” Donald Wolfe wrote in The Last Days of Marilyn Monroe. “In his darkroom, the photographer was shocked to see that the photographs were of an unconscious Marilyn being sexually abused in the presence of mob boss Sam Giancana and Sinatra. Marilyn had been drugged…When Sinatra was given the negatives and prints, Woodfield suggested that Sinatra burn them, but the pictures were intended to insure Marilyn’s silence.” Find out more in The Empty Glass. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marilyn Monroe’s housekeeper, Eunice Murray, claimed she’d noticed a light under the actress’s door when she went to bed around ten on the night of the actress’s death. Murray went to bed in her own room, adjacent to Monroe’s; they shared a wall. She woke at midnight and had to go to the bathroom, she said, so she went into the hall. She noticed that the light was still on under the door, and she became alarmed. She tried the door, but it was locked from the inside. She knocked: no answer.

But why would she have gone into the hall to use the bathroom when one was accessible through her room? And the carpet pile in Monroe’s room was so thick and high that it made closing the door difficult. This meant that no light could possibly have escaped underneath. So how did Murray know that Monroe’s light was still on? Read more in The Empty Glass. 

The star in a poster for a nightclub in the Andalusian city

“Speaking of Oscars, I would win overwhelmingly if the Academy gave an Oscar for faking orgasms. I have done some of my best acting convincing my partners I was in the throes of ecstasy.”

You can read it here.

From The Empty Glass:

“February 2, 2:01 a.m. I hear clicking on the line. That’s what it sounds like—Morse code. Faint voices all around. Bars are on the windows but the night is dark and the pool should be lit but it’s not on account of the remodel. A few times I heard noises like people at the window but I looked around. No one there and so now, see? Who’s crazy now?!!!

“Mrs. Murray is padding around in her slippers I can hear her pad- ding through the door and once I thought about getting up and going to talk but don’t feel like it. I called a few people. NO ONE was home, or they were all ignoring me. They always ignore me so all I have left is YOU, Diary!!

“They are following me I know it there are wires in the walls I have called Fred and there are bugs. I don’t mean insects.”

Read more here.

George Piscitelle

According to Anthony Summers in Goddess, the mob boss Mickey Cohen engaged in a series of shakedowns involving Hollywood starlets: He would hire “handsome Italian boys” to seduce female stars so that their sex could be recorded. The recordings would then be used to blackmail the stars. This is allegedly what happened with Lana Turner and Johnny Stompanato, who engaged in a violent and abusive affair that ended with Stompanato being shot by Turner’s daughter in 1958. (“Recordings of Turner and Stompanato making love were peddled for hundreds of dollars each,” Summers wrote.)

The devastatingly handsome 28-year-old George Piscitelle allegedly seduced Marilyn Monroe: Gary Wean from the DA’s office was surveilling Piscitelle when he saw the man leave Plymouth House, a restaurant on Sunset Boulevard, with Monroe, taking her to a motel on Van Nuys Boulevard.

See it here

 

According to the Marilyn Monroe toxicology report, the actress had 4.5 percent milligrams of barbiturates and 8 percent chloral hydrate in her bloodstream, which means she would have had to swallow around 30 to 40 phenobarbital, or Nembutals. And this doesn’t account for the 13 percent phenobarbital the toxicologist, Ralph Abernethy, found in the liver. That added percent means that Monroe would have had to ingest 50, if not 80, pills by mouth. She would also have had to swallow them quickly, since (if given time) the body rejects the poison, vomiting it up—and yet there was no water in the house…and no water glass on the table initially. In the entire history of forensics, no one has ever died with such high blood concentrations of phenobarb and chloral hydrate as a result of oral ingestion. Find out more in The Empty Glass. 

It may be that Dr. Ralph Greenson, Marilyn Monroe’s psychiatrist, was a little in love with his patient. He certainly behaved inappropriately toward her—inviting her to his house for family dinners, for instance. (She became close to his son Danny, who allegedly provided her with a list of questions to ask the Attorney General Bobby Kennedy at the dinner where they met at the Peter Lawford beach house.) He also allegedly tried to help Monroe achieve her first orgasm. (Sigmund Freud, eat your heart out.)

John Miner, who was Los Angeles’s district attorney and present at the Monroe autopsy, claims he heard tapes that Greenson made in which Monroe described the orgasms he had helped her achieve:

“Bless you doctor. What you say is gospel to me. By now I’ve had lots of orgasms. Not only one but two and three with a man who takes his time.

“I never cried so hard as I did afterwards. It was because of all the years I had never had one. What wasted years. How can I describe to you, a man, what it feels like to a woman? I’ll try.

“Think of a light switch with a rheostat control (dimmer). As you begin to turn it on, the bulb begins to get bright, then brighter, and brighter and finally in a blinding flash is fully lit.

“It is so good… Doctor, I worship you.”

In a word: yuck.

Some believe that, toward the end of her life, Monroe was becoming disenchanted with her doctor, as in fact she eventually became disenchanted with almost anyone who didn’t leave her. Had she threatened to leave him? Did the man who counted on his famous client want some kind of revenge? This is a bit of a stretch (Greenson was never quite the same after Monroe died, blaming himself for her death), but much remains unexplained about the doc’s involvement—not least the fact that he himself had hired Eunice Murray for Monroe, possibly using the housekeeper as a way of spying on his famous client. Learn more in The Empty Glass.

Great review here.

 

Some really great stuff in here.

Reading THE EMPTY GLASS on the beach.

See the link here.

John Miner, who was Los Angeles’s district attorney and present at the Monroe autopsy, claims he heard tapes that the actress’s shrink, Dr. Ralph Greenson, made in which Monroe described the orgasms he had helped her achieve:

“Bless you doctor. What you say is gospel to me. By now I’ve had lots of orgasms. Not only one but two and three with a man who takes his time.

“I never cried so hard as I did afterwards. It was because of all the years I had never had one. What wasted years. How can I describe to you, a man, what it feels like to a woman? I’ll try.

“Think of a light switch with a rheostat control (dimmer). As you begin to turn it on, the bulb begins to get bright, then brighter, and brighter and finally in a blinding flash is fully lit.

“It is so good… Doctor, I worship you.”

Finally, it’s here. And you can buy it here.